Archives

  • Vol. 7 No. 2 (2023)

    Table of Contents

    Pierre Villard - Jack M. Sasson, Chapel Hill, NC.

    ‘Transitional Cases’, Allonymy, and the Use of Aramaic in the Early Neo-Assyrian Provincial Administration:The Example of Ilu-bāni/-ibni of Sūḫu - Alexander Johannes Edmonds

    Divine Battles in the Akkadian Period - Laura Battini

     Work Hard, Play Hard: Gameboards and Merchants’ Way of Life in Middle Bronze Age Anatolia - Nancy Highcock and Yağmur Heffron

    Updating the Presence of Beveled Rim Bowls in Northern Central Zagros. Some Preliminary Data from Tepe Qaleh Naneh (Kurdistan) - Ali Binandeh and Silvana Di Paolo

    Qalat-e- Shah: a Median or Islamic Watch Tower in Northwestern Iran? - Ali Binandeh, Mohammad Hossein Rezaei and Obeidollah Sorkhabi

  • Vol. 7 No. 1 (2023)

    Table of Contents

    Hommage to Pierre Villard

    The use of early photography for archaeological research: The 1929-1931 expedition to Meskeneh/Balis (Syria) in the photograph collection of the Biblioteca Berenson in Florence – Stefano Anastasio

    The place of deportation of the Babylonian divine statues – Pierre Villard

    Taharqa, not Ushanahuru: Reconsidering the identity of the African individual on the victory stele of Esarhaddon – Mattias Karlsson

    A selection of metalwork from classical antiquity and the Middle Ages from Cilicia in southern Turkey – Ergün Laflı and Alev Çetingöz

    Down-the-line from the Persian Gulf to the Armenian Highlands: Archaeomalacology as a tool for the recognition of long-distance connections during the Middle Bronze Age – Andrea Cesaretti, Maria Flavia Gravina and Roberto Dan

    From Jemdet Nasr origins to an early Muslim town in the wetlands: second preliminary report on excavations at Kobeba (Dhi Qar governorate), southern Iraq – St John Simpson

  • Vol. 6 No. 2 (2022)

    Table of Contents

    Degrees of jurisdiction and the notion of appeal in the Neo-Assyrian period – Pierre Villard

    Some inlays, a stone mace and an engraved plaque – Barbara Couturaud

    Architectural and decorative remains from the 16th and 17th centuries – Imane Fayyad

    A 3D model recovers its current location – Laura Battini

  • Vol. 6 No. 1 (2022)

    Table of Contents

    Obituary: Agnès Spycket (1921-2022) – Nicole Chevalier

    Tulul Kobeba: First results of survey and excavation at a looted early medieval ‘marsh Arab’ township in Dhi-Qar province, southern Iraq – St John Simpson

    NBC 3171: A recarved Old Babylonian/ Kassite seal – Agnete W. Lassen and Enrique Jiménez

    Some remarks on the beheading iconography from the lands between the Taurus and Greater Caucasus – Roberto Dan and Andrea Cesaretti

    The cat, a hidden pet in Mesopotamia? Tablet 45 of Šumma alu and a method to identify this feline – Laura Battini

  • Vol. 5 No. 2 (2021)

    Table of Contents

    The Assyrian Stylized Tree: A Date Palm Plantation and Aššurnaṣirpal II’s Stemma – Norma Franklin

    Mechanical Examination of Swords in the Eastern Mediterranean from the Late Bronze Age to the Early Iron Age – K. Kopanias, E. Vemou and K. Sidiropoulou

    The first Bronze Age bull-headed lyre from south-east Arabia? Tantalising shell inlays from the third millennium BC (Umm an-Nar) site of al-Tikha, Sultanate of Oman – St J. Simpson

    Appositive Semantic Classification in Sumerian Cuneiform and the Implementation of iClassifier – Gebhard J. Selz

  • Vol. 5 No. 1 (2021)

    Ash-sharq is a journal devoted to short articles on the archaeology, history and society of the Ancient Near East. It is published twice a year. The principal language of the publication is English; there will be some provision for papers in the languages currently spoken in the Middle East (Arabic, Hebrew, Kurde, Persian, Turkish), accompanied by an English abstract of 500 words.

  • Vol. 4 (2020)

    Ash-sharq is a journal devoted to short articles on the archaeology, history and society of the Ancient Near East. It is published twice a year. The principal language of the publication is English; there will be some provision for papers in the languages currently spoken in the Middle East (Arabic, Hebrew, Kurde, Persian, Turkish), accompanied by an English abstract of 500 words.

  • Vol. 3 No. 2 (2019)

    Ash-sharq is a journal devoted to short articles on the archaeology, history and society of the Ancient Near East. It is published twice a year. The principal language of the publication is English; there will be some provision for papers in the languages currently spoken in the Middle East (Arabic, Hebrew, Kurde, Persian, Turkish), accompanied by an English abstract of 500 words.

  • Vol. 3 No. 1 (2019)

    Ash-sharq is a journal devoted to short articles on the archaeology, history and society of the Ancient Near East. It is published twice a year. The principal language of the publication is English; there will be some provision for papers in the languages currently spoken in the Middle East (Arabic, Hebrew, Kurde, Persian, Turkish), accompanied by an English abstract of 500 words.

  • Vol. 2 No. 2 (2018)

    Ash-sharq is a journal devoted to short articles on the archaeology, history and society of the Ancient Near East. It is published twice a year. The principal language of the publication is English; there will be some provision for papers in the languages currently spoken in the Middle East (Arabic, Hebrew, Kurde, Persian, Turkish), accompanied by an English abstract of 500 words.

  • Vol. 2 No. 1 (2018)

    Ash-sharq is a journal devoted to short articles on the archaeology, history and society of the Ancient Near East. It is published twice a year. The principal language of the publication is English; there will be some provision for papers in the languages currently spoken in the Middle East (Arabic, Hebrew, Kurde, Persian, Turkish), accompanied by an English abstract of 500 words.

  • Vol. 1 No. 2 (2017)

    Ash-sharq is a journal devoted to short articles on the archaeology, history and society of the Ancient Near East. It is published twice a year. The principal language of the publication is English; there will be some provision for papers in the languages currently spoken in the Middle East (Arabic, Hebrew, Kurde, Persian, Turkish), accompanied by an English abstract of 500 words.

  • Vol. 1 No. 1 (2017)

    Ash-sharq is a journal devoted to short articles on the archaeology, history and society of the Ancient Near East. It is published twice a year. The principal language of the publication is English; there will be some provision for papers in the languages currently spoken in the Middle East (Arabic, Hebrew, Kurde, Persian, Turkish), accompanied by an English abstract of 500 words.